Speech Correction: Principles and Methods

By C. Van Riper | Go to book overview
thinking should be given in very small doses and only under the guidance of the instructor, since much verbal and mental confusion can result from this type of speech conflict. If the thinking in English is carried out entirely in one situation, it tends to produce no such conflict, and later on a gradual spread to other situations occurs. Acquiring perfect English after one is an adult is no easy task, but, with patience and intelligent direction, it can be accomplished.
References
1. Barrows S. T., An Introduction to the Phonetic Alphabet ( revised edition), Boston, Expression Co., 1938. A manual of graded lessons in the acquisition of the skills needed in phonetic transcription.
2. Bender J. F., and Kleinfeld V. M., Principles and Practices of Speech Correction, pages 113-115, New York, Pitman Publishing Corporation, 1938. This part of the text describes the use of arrow symbols in the transcription of inflections.
3. Borden R. C., and Busse A. C., Speech Correction, pages 160-207, New York, F. S. Crofts and Co., 1929.

This chapter includes a description of the errors made by foreign- speaking individuals and the various methods for their correction. Rules are given for clearing up some of the confusions due to the peculiarities of English spelling.

4. Buckingham B. R., and Dolch E. W., A Combined Word List, Boston, Ginn and Co., 1936.

A compilation of the 19,000 most frequently used words in English. The rankings of each word as assigned by various authors of other word lists are given.

5. Caldwell F., and Mowry M., "The Essay Versus the Objective Examination as Measures of the Achievement of Bilingual Children," Journal of Educational Psychology, 1933, Vol. 24, pages 695-702.

Spanish-speaking children in the third to the eighth grades inclusive did much better on the objective type of examination. Specific phases of the language handicap are discussed.

6. DeVargas D., "Teaching 'Mexicans' an English Vocabulary," Elementary English Review, 1937, Vol. 14, page 31.

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