The Poet in the Poem: The Personae of Eliot, Yeats, and Pound

By George T. Wright | Go to book overview

3
Yeats: The Tradition of Myself

ANY GENERALIZATION about the nature of modern poetry inevitably runs up against the intransigeant poetry of Yeats, and at that point often requires modification. This is true for several reasons, mainly perhaps because the poetry of Yeats is so many things and resists general statements about it as a whole, but also because in the process of "modernizing" himself Yeats carried into his mature poetry so much of the later nineteenth- century poetic paraphernalia that are not modern. His choice of poems for The Oxford Book of Modern Verse, 1892-1935 ( New York, 1936) is revealing. The poets to whom he gives the greatest space do not belong to the school of Eliot and Pound, nor to the later group of Auden, Day Lewis, MacNeice, and Spender. The bulk of the book is given over to writers of the nineties or of later decades who accept and make use of a very unmodern mythology of dreams, desires, and passionate expressions of passionate longings. The poets are in love with Death, with Love, with their own Passionate Experience, and they are concerned to state their particular emotions. In such roles as those of lover, sage, sensualist, they tell the reader how they feel. There is no satire: poems descriptive of people or of the world aim at the expression pathos or indignation, and the statement of emotion is decorated with rhyme and meter in order to make it a poem. Of the ninety-seven

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Poet in the Poem: The Personae of Eliot, Yeats, and Pound
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • Titles of Abbreviated Sources xiv
  • 1 - The Faces of the Poet 1
  • 2 - Eliot: the Transformation Of a Personality 60
  • 3 - Yeats: the Tradition of Myself 88
  • 4 - Pound: the God Inside 124
  • 5 - Conclusion 158
  • Notes 165
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 170

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.