Ethnic Groups and Marital Choices: Ethnic History and Marital Assimilation in Canada, 1871 and 1971

By Madeline A. Richard | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION
1
The original agreements resulted in the admittance of 150 nationals from India, 100 from Pakistan, and 50 from Ceylon, annually. In 1958 the numbers were increased slightly. See Kalbach ( 1970:21).
2
'Almost immediately (following the removal of restrictions based on ethnic origin) considerable increases in the number of immigrants from China, India, Pakistan, and the West Indies occurred' ( Burnet and Palmer 1988:41).
3
A detailed description of the sampling technique used to create the Public Use Sample is presented in Chapter 2, Section 1 under the title Sample Design ( Statistics Canada 1975: 2.1.1-2.4.1).
4
The amount of ethnic intermarriage in 1971 suffers from further underestimation due to the presentation of data for Scandinavians, rather than its components of Danish, Swedish, Icelandic, and Norwegian. The usual reason given for not providing data for individual ethnic origin populations is size. Small groups are generally included in Other. Witness the addition of more recent immigrant groups to the publications of the 1981 Census that were previously included in Other in the 1971 Census.
5
It should be noted that the Public Use Sample Tapes are only a sample, and, therefore, the Ns will not necessarily agree with those from census publications. The tape documentation states 'they will inevitably differ to some extent, due to the chance in selection of actual cases for the Public Use Sample' ( Statistics Canada 1975:1.3.1).
6
This suggestion was actually pointed out by Yinger's colleague, Professor John Hewitt. See Yinger ( 1968:98, n. 6).
7
Goodman ( 1972) calls it a modified regression approach.
8
Normally the logit is defined as half the log of the odds. Goodman's

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethnic Groups and Marital Choices: Ethnic History and Marital Assimilation in Canada, 1871 and 1971
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 3
  • Chapter Two - the Relationship Between Intermarriage and Assimilation: Patterns, Correlates, and Determinants 16
  • Summary 38
  • Chapter Three - Canada's Immigrants: Patterns of Immigration and Ethnic Settlement 40
  • Chapter Four - Canada's Ethnic Populations 76
  • Summary 103
  • Chapter Five - Prevalence and Patterns of Intermarriage in Canada, 1871 and 1971 106
  • Summary 123
  • Chapter Six - Group and Individual Factors 126
  • Chapter Seven - Conclusion 145
  • Conclusions 152
  • Appendices 157
  • Notes 161
  • Bibliography 169
  • Name Index 181
  • Subject Index 185
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.