Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities

By Meyer Weinberg | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
Cambodia

Unlike China, Korea, and Vietnam, government-sponsored education in Cambodia played virtually no part in its early history. Some 800 years ago, state education in Cambodia was reserved for children of the elite. 1 During the 1880s, years after the country became a colony--technically, a protectorate 2 of France --some Chinese and Vietnamese children in the country's capital, Phnom Penh, attended a French-managed school. Many Cambodian parents kept their children out of the school. 3 Only in 1904 did Cambodian authorities begin to establish a national system of education. The following year, officials reported 750 pupils attended protectorate schools in the capital city. These numbers included 29 princes and 25 princesses. 4 Not until some 25 years later was the country's first lycée (high school) built.

Ordinary people had to depend, for their education, on pagoda schools attached to Buddhist temples and taught by the bonzes, or monks. These schools, which were to be found throughout the country, were open only to boys and men. No institution existed for girls and women. It was common practice for males to enter the temples for some months or even years before marrying. As Bilodeau contended, however, the educational content of this traditional schooling was scant:

The pagoda schools . . . were schools only in name. The pupils' chief role was to act as servants to the bonzes, accompanying them on their morning begging expeditions and cleaning the temple buildings. The pagoda schools had no curriculum, time table, inspectors or examinations. . . . Their only instruction was during part of the afternoon, when they learnt to read the sacred texts (which were inscribed

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Asian-American Education: Historical Background and Current Realities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter One: Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - China 12
  • Chapter Two - China 36
  • Notes 37
  • Chapter Three - Chap 42
  • Notes 67
  • Chapter Four - Korea 74
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter Five - Philippines 97
  • Notes 122
  • Concluding Remarks 128
  • Notes 151
  • Chapter Seven - Cambodia 156
  • Concluding Remarks 170
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter Eight Laos 176
  • Notes 199
  • Chapter Nine Hong Kong 205
  • Notes 221
  • Chapter Ten Taiwan 226
  • Notes 237
  • Chapter Eleven Micronesia 241
  • Notes 255
  • Chapter Twelve Polynesia 259
  • Notes 281
  • Chapter Thirteen India 287
  • Notes 307
  • Chapter Fourteen Cross-Group Issues 313
  • Notes 327
  • Index 331
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 350

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.