South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948

By David Duncan Wallace | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
SPANISH AND FRENCH SETTLEMENTS AND EXPLORATIONS, 1521-1586

SOUTH CAROLINA has been an outpost, first of Spain, then of France, again of Spain, and finally of England, in their fateful contest for empire. The first Europeans to set foot upon her soil were Spaniards.

Ayllon's Settlement. --Lucas Vasquez de Ayllon, of Toledo, was one of the better type of officials who had come to seek wealth and fame in Santo Domingo, or, as they called it, Hispaniola. Late in 1520, having associated with himself another official, he dispatched a ship to explore the Atlantic coast of North America. After sailing far to the north, Ayllon's ship on its return voyage met among the Bahamas a vessel that had been sent out from Santo Domingo by another official but on a less creditable mission--the capture of Indians as slaves to supplement the waning supply in. Santo Domingo, half of whose population had perished in a few years under the Spaniards' inhuman treatment. Ayllon, though the owner of hundreds of Santo Domingan natives, had charged his captain against enslaving the people of any coasts that he might discover, but the result of a conference with Quexos, the captain of the other vessel, was that the two set sail for the mainland with this very purpose. On June 24, 1521, they came upon the coast at latitude 33 degrees 30 minutes at the mouth of a considerable river, to which, since it was St. John Baptist's Day, they gave his name. The mouth of Winyaw Bay, which narrows down to the size of a bold river through which the united waters of the Peedee, the Black, the Sampit, and the Waccamaw enter the sea, seems to be the River Saint John Baptist. It lies only 17½ minutes south of 33 degrees 30 minutes, the latitude which Quexos gives, and, moreover, reference to crossing the bay adds to the probability that this was the entrance into which the explorers sailed.

The natives, who called the region Chicora, fled in terror, but the Spaniards overtook a man and a woman and brought them on board. After treating them with flattering kindness and clothing their nakedness with European dress, they sent them ashore. The captains took formal possession of the country in the name of their king and of their respective employers. They explored inland and were treated by the natives with hospitality. This friendliness was made by the Spaniards the means

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 756

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.