South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948

By David Duncan Wallace | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXXII
SOUTH CAROLINA BEGINS THE SECOND WAR OF THE REVOLUTION, 1780

THE SITUATION in South Carolina after the fall of Charlestown could hardly have been gloomier for the Americans. The British had not only taken the capital but had virtually conquered the State. An appreciable proportion of the population viewed this situation with pleasure. The great majority of those feeling regret accepted it as inevitable. To the annihilation of their army was added the destruction of their civil government save for a peripatetic governor in headlong flight.

Clinton ordered three expeditions to the interior, one to hold Augusta, one Ninety Six, and one Camden. Lord Cornwallis dispatched Tarleton after Colonel Buford* who was retreating with Virginia Continentals whom he had intended for the relief of Charlestown. On May 29 Tarleton overtook Buford six miles south of the North Carolina line and eight miles east of the present town of Lancaster, and, when surrender was refused, attacked with such suddenness and fury as utterly to ruin his foe. After the Americans had surrendered, thrown down their arms, and begged for quarter, the British continued their slaughter. Only about 30 of the 350 Americans escaped capture, severe wounding, or death. The compassion stirred in the inhabitants who nursed the wounded and the cry of anguished rage that greeted the savagery throughout the State turned Tarleton's victory into a British disaster, for it planted in the hearts of thousands who had accepted renewed British rule the determination to expel a power which could be guilty of such cruelty.

James says that " Tarleton burnt the home of General Sumter near Stateburgh, and roused the spirit of the lion." The era now opening was for South Carolina her second war of Revolution. She had entered upon the first in resistance to unconstitutional taxation, made more irksome by other well-recognized grievances. She was driven into the second by Clinton's breach of his plighted faith of May 12, 1780, soon to be noticed, and the barbarity with which the arrogant conquerors expressed their contempt for beaten rebels. The folly with which British politicians precipitated the first Revolution was now paralleled by the stupid cruelty

____________________
*
Full names of Revolutionary officers will be found in the Index of this book.

-295-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 756

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.