South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948

By David Duncan Wallace | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER XLIII
TARIFFS, BANKING, AND THE TEXAS QUESTION, 1833-1846

THE BITTER generation from 1832 to 1860: a generation of brilliant and swift absorbing drama with half a continent for its stage; for South Carolina a generation in which her aristocracy reached its highest splendor and her poor a deep degradation, and the proudest society in America desperately staked its all on an obsolete economic order against the power of modern life constantly upbuilding a mighty North; a period of large illiteracy, of absolutely or relatively declining commerce, of a ceaseless drain of population and capital to the West, of wasting soil; a period in which the intellect of South Carolina had ceased to grow. Such were the results of South Carolina's binding herself to slavery and committing her mind to the support of impossible ideas.

The hatred between Nullifiers and Unionists lasted into the 1840's, when it rapidly fused into common hatred of abolitionism. Poinsett in 1836 resented the strict partisanship of elections by the South Carolina legislature. A Mercury correspondent denounced the removal of Nullifiers by the Charleston Council as worse than the despotism of Russia or Algiers. F. W. Pickens told Congress on May 26, 1836, that Jackson's appealing to the heterogeneous mass of the people implied a brutal tyranny such as Janissaries sometimes found freedom from by bowstringing the Sultan; and Governor McDuffie in November warned the legislature that no South Carolinian could hold office under the Federal administration without being an accomplice in overthrowing his State's vital interests.

The Dictatorship of Calhoun. --Calhoun, all but dictator of South Carolina because he so truly and powerfully expressed her views, was becoming more and more the central figure of Southern politics. Yet, "when Calhoun took snuff, South Carolina sneezed," was only half true, for he perceived when he fell into the little irregularity of approving the Federal government's improving the Mississippi River that he must be careful to take the right brand. His power in Congress was greater than ever, because he was ready, unattached to party, to throw himself to either side. He was in effect an eclectic Democrat although professing to belong to that nonexistent thing, "the Republican party of 1799."

-419-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
South Carolina: A Short History, 1520-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 756

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?