Communication, Language, and Meaning: Psychological Perspectives

By George A. Miller | Go to book overview

INDEX
ALPHABET, 128-130, 132-135; alphabetic code 120-122, 124-126, see also code; alphabetic relation to phonetic message, 139; backwards, 288; modified, 121, 123
ambiguity, 10-11, 38-40, 43, 45, 193; ambiguous sentences, 25; ambiguous signals, 91; grammatical, 8, see also grammar; semantic, 47, see also semantics
Ames, L. B., 68
analysis, 121-122, 196, 215; content, 209-210, 226; interaction process, 209-210; linguistic, 138, 256; programs of, 116; speech, 151, see also speech; of words, 26
anatomical asymetries, 70
apes, 74, 85-90, 95-106; communication of, 95-96; grunts of, 6, 76, see also vocal; social life of, 92
aphasias, 56-58, 61-65, 69, 266
appeals to fear, 246-248, 251
approximations to English. See statistical approximations to English
Ardrey, R., 73
Aristotle, 45
articulatory movements, 133
attitudes, 210-212, 253-254, 283-286; change, 242, 247, 250; language, 268, 270
authoritarian type, 213
BABBLING, 51, 75, 134, 138; stage, 81
Bastian, H. C., 62
Bauer, R., 226
behaviorist, 37, 174
Bellugi, U., 90
bilingualism, 271, 276-277, 280-290
biological aspects, 49-60, 261
bird-headed dwarfs, 51
birds, 74-82, 95; song, 73-83
bit, 188-189
Bloomfield, L., 121
Blount, B., 107
brain, 61-72; and communication, 49, 61; damaged children, 70, see also children; evolution of, 72, see also evolution; left side of, 55, 62, 65-67, 69, 137, see also dominance; structure of, 14, 20, see also structure
Braine, M., 100
Bransford, J., 166-167
Broca, P., 56, 61-64, 71
CARROLL, J. B., 118
Chall, J., 124
children, 51-54, 57-59, 74-75, 79-82, 97-100, 107-116, 119-123, 154-155, 232-233; blind, 53, 130; brain damaged, see brain; deaf, 53, 130; dominance in, 68; learning language, 14, 21, 107-116, 158, 190, 281; phonating, 102; reading, 117, 125-126, see also reading; responses to fear, 249, see also appeals to fear; utterances of, 6; who have never been able to speak, 51
chimpanzee, 51-53, 97-98, 102-105, 113; ability to learn, 90, see also learning; baby, 74
Chomsky, N., 115, 190-191
Cloze procedure, 190, 257-258
code, 129, 135; alphabetic, 120-122, 124-126, see also alphabet; linguistic, 177; Morse telegraphic, 132; speech, 128-140, see also speech
code-emphasis. See reading
code switching. See switching
communication, 3-12, 84-106, 196- 241; communication-persuasion matrix, 243; definition, 3; formal characteristics of, 209; man-computer, 148, 200, 206; mass, 127, 219-230; nonverbal, 231-241; pri

-299-

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Communication, Language, and Meaning: Psychological Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • The Authors v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • 1: Psychology and Communication 3
  • 2: Psychology and the Theory of Language 13
  • 3: The Realm of Syntax 23
  • 4: The Realm of Meaning 36
  • 5: Biological Aspects of Language 49
  • 6: The Brain and Language 61
  • 7: Speech Development and Bird Song: Are There Any Parallels? 73
  • 8: Primate Communication 84
  • 9: Teaching Apes to Communicate 95
  • 10: The Development of Language in Children 107
  • 11 - Learning to Read 117
  • 12: The Speech Code 128
  • 13: Artificial Speech 141
  • 14: Language and Perception 149
  • 15: Language and Memory 159
  • 16: Language and Thought 172
  • 17: Language and Probability 185
  • 18: Communication and Computers 196
  • 19: Communication in Small Groups 208
  • 20: Mass Communication 219
  • 21: Nonverbal Communication 231
  • 22: Persuasion 242
  • 23: Language and Psychopathology 256
  • 24: The Sociology of Language 268
  • 25: Translation and Bilingualism 280
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 291
  • Index 299
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