George Bernard Shaw: Man of the Century

By Archibald Henderson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 24
With Hoops of Steel

BEATRICE WEBB, OF UPPER MIDDLE-CLASS FAMILY, THE POTTERS, WHO MOVED in aristocratic circles, independently came to the conclusion that, instead of "coming out" elaborately, for the purpose of making herself conspicuous in the "marriage mart," she would follow her own instincts and do social service work in the East End. She became interested in the drab life of the factory workers through conversations with her old nurse. At the time she became acquainted with leading Fabians, she had already made something of a name for herself as a student of working-class conditions under her relative, Charles Booth, who financed and directed a huge investigation of poverty in England, with the object of controverting Marx's shocking revelations.

Leaving the West End and the political plutocracy, she worked anonymously in sweaters' dens to discover the truth regarding the lives of the submerged tenth. She was neither expert needlewoman nor seamstress; but with her unassuming manner and eager interest, she won the hearts of the garment- workers. To such an extent, indeed, that her new-found friends insisted upon marrying her to one of their sons, Isaac or Moses, telescoped into Ikey Moe, the generic name for the rising male hopeful. Hastily escaping from this amusing but awkward predicament, she began another type of research, into the history of cooperation from the consumers' standpoint. She produced a small pioneering work, The Cooperative Movement, begun in November, 1889, of which Sidney Webb said that "it ought to have taken you six weeks to write, not seven months." A month earlier she had read Fabian Essays; and, probably understanding little of the other essays through ignorance of economics, was exhilarated by Sidney's because, as she said, "he has the historic sense" and wrote a language she understood.

Like Shaw's mother, Beatrice at first and for some years regarded the Fabian Society as a group of wild-eyed radicals, anarchistic ragamuffins, adolescent gas-bags, with a few of the middle-class intelligentsia thrown in to leaven the lump. Shaw records that Beatrice entered the Society late and "began with an intense contempt for us as a rabble of silly suburban faddists." Before Beatrice joined the Fabian Society one of the standing jokes among the Fabians who were Socialist "Souls," so to speak, was over the fascinated interest she displayed in the Society as a private "marriage mart" of her own. It seems

-327-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
George Bernard Shaw: Man of the Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 978

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.