George Bernard Shaw: Man of the Century

By Archibald Henderson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I am indebted to everyone who has written anything of importance and value about Shaw, in any language. The overwhelming majority of writings of this sort--book, pamphlet, magazine, newspaper, broadcast, what you will, is to be found in the Archibald Henderson Collection of Bernard Shaw, housed here in the University of North Carolina Library. These materials, which include many scrapbooks, cover a span of upwards of a century, and were gathered during a period of more than half a century. Their processing and organizing will require a number of years for completion. The illustrations for the Centennial Biography derive from the Archibald Henderson Collection of Bernard Shaw.

After obtaining the authorization from the late Mr. Shaw for the preparation of the Centennial Biography, the assurance of his assistance, and his blessing upon this work, I sent out the following appeal, which appeared in magazines and newspapers throughout the civilized world:

All readers, admirers, correspondents, acquaintances, friends, translators, interpreters, enemies, cartoonists, satirists, caricaturists, sculptors, painters, photographers of the wayward Irishman are invited to co-operate with me in the vast project of the Centennial Biography of Bernard Shaw. This work, designed for publication in 1956, Mr. Shaw-s centennial year, will probably run to several volumes, and like my earlier work on Shaw is authorized by the subject. Correspondence with owners of manuscripts, letters, postcards, likenesses, caricatures, cartoons, programmes, playbills, portraits of players in Shaw roles, photographs of scenes from his plays, and all other types of Shaviana, is earnestly invited.--Archibald Henderson, 721 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.

The response was gratifying and impressive; and materials of every description poured in, including original manuscripts, letters, postcards; photostatic and photographic copies of such holographic materials; printed books, pamphlets, magazine articles and newspaper cuttings; and mementos of various sorts, including photographs, theater programs and playbills, fly sheets, leaflets, tracts, Shavian olla podrida. Strangers gave me batches of Shaviana collected over long periods; and not a few wrote reminiscences of Shaw which had never been printed.

To all givers and lenders of such materials, sincere thanks and gratitude are here extended. In the text of the Centennial Biography, innumerable

-899-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
George Bernard Shaw: Man of the Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 978

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.