The Theatre--Advancing

By Edward Gordon Craig | Go to book overview

THE THEATRE-- ADVANCING

BY EDWARD GORDON CRAIG

AUTHOR OF "ON THE ART OF THE THEATRE," "T0WARDS A NEW THEATRE," ETC.

BOSTON LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY 1920

-iii-

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The Theatre--Advancing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Part I 1
  • A Plea for Two Theatres - This Essay Is Dedicated to the Tired Business Man 3
  • A Durable Theatre 9
  • The Modern Theatre, and Another 34
  • In Defence of the Artist 39
  • The Open Air 43
  • Belief and Make-Believe - A Footnote to "The Actor and the Über-Marionette." 48
  • Imagination 58
  • Part II 65
  • Theatrical Reform 67
  • Public Opinion 73
  • Proposals Old and New - A Dialogue Between A Theatrical Manager and An Artist of the Theatre. 78
  • Part III 91
  • Gentlemen, the Marionette! 93
  • On Masks - By A Bishop and by Me 111
  • Shakespeares Collaborators 114
  • In a Restaurant 124
  • "Literary" Theatres 130
  • Art or Imitation? - A Plea for An Enquiry After the Missing Laws of the Art 132
  • A Conversation with Jules Champfleury 144
  • The Theatre in Italy: Naples and Pompeii - A Letter to John Semar 153
  • Church and Stage: in Rome - "When in Rome Do as the Romans Do." 164
  • Thoroughness in the Theatre 179
  • On Learning Magic - A Dialogue Many Times Repeated 196
  • Tuition in Art - A Note to the Younger Generation of Theatrical Students 201
  • On the Old School of Acting 209
  • A Letter to Ellen Terry 220
  • Yvette Guilbert 229
  • Sada Yacco 232
  • New Departures 237
  • The Wise and the Foolish Virgins 239
  • To Eleonora Duse 241
  • Ladies, Temperament and Discipline 248
  • Part IV 253
  • The Copyright Law - A Suggestion for An Amendment 255
  • The New Theme: Poverty 258
  • The Voice 260
  • Theatrical Love 261
  • Realism, or Nerve-Tickling 263
  • The Poet and Motion Pictures 266
  • The True Hamlet 269
  • The Futurists 272
  • Fire! Fire! 278
  • Appendices 295
  • Appendix A 297
  • Appendix B 297
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