Hazlitt on English Literature: An Introduction to the Appreciation of Literature

By Jacob Zeitlin | Go to book overview

HAZLITT ON ENGLISH LITERATURE
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE APPRECIATION OF LITERATURE

BY JACOB ZEITLIN, PH.D. ASSOCIATE IN ENGLISH UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

NEW YORK OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS AMERICAN BRANCH: 35 WEST 32ND STREET LONDON, TORONTO, MELBOURNE, AND BOMBAY HUMPHREY MILFORD 1913 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

-i-

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Hazlitt on English Literature: An Introduction to the Appreciation of Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents vii
  • Chronology of Hazlitt's Life and Writings ix
  • Introduction xi
  • I - The Age of Elizabeth 1
  • II - Spenser 21
  • III - Shakspeare 34
  • IV - The Characters of Shakspeare's Plays 50
  • V - Milton 101
  • VI - Pope 118
  • VII - On the Periodical Essayists 133
  • VIII - The English Novelists 155
  • IX - Character of Mr. Burke, 1807 172
  • X - Mr. Wordsworth 191
  • XI - Mr. Coleridge 205
  • XII - Mr. Southey 216
  • XIII - Elia 220
  • XIV - Sir Walter Scott 227
  • XV - Lord Byron 236
  • XVI - On Poetry in General 251
  • XVII - My First Acquaintance with Poets 277
  • XVIII - On the Conversation of Authors 301
  • XIX - Of Persons One Would Wish to Have Seen 315
  • XX - On Reading Old Books 333
  • Notes 349
  • Index 431
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