Scottsboro Boy

By Haywood Patterson; Earl Conrad | Go to book overview

Too many women from my boyhood on have shown a desire for me so that I don't have to press myself on anyone not wanting me.

My mother and father, they lived together as husband and wife for thirty-seven years, honest working people. They had many children and they taught us to respect the human being and the human form.

I was also taught to demand respect from others.

Now it is a strange thing that what I have just said I never had a chance to say in an Alabama court. No Alabama judge or jury in the four trials I had ever asked me for my views. Nobody asked about my feelings. Those Alabama people, they didn't believe I had any, nor the right to any.


Chapter 3

BACK in Gadsden jail we could look outside and see where an old gallows was rigged up. Must have gone back to the slavey days. We didn't like nothing at all about the place; we didn't like our death sentence; and we decided to put on a kick. I said to the man who brought me a prison meal, "I don't want that stuff. Bring me some pork chops."

"Huh, pork chops?"

"Yes, pork chops. You got to get it. We're going to die and we can have anything we want."

All the fellows laid down a yell, "Pork chops!"

We crowded up to the bars. We put our hands out and shook fingers at him. We hollered, "Pork chops. Nothing else."

This guy, he went down someplace and got the pork chops. He brought it to us. Just the food I wanted. I always liked pork meats. After we ate, still we weren't satisfied.

The deputies and guards, they were scared of us now like we would make a jailbreak. Our heads were up against those checkerboard bars and we talked sharp.

The sheriff spoke to me because I was raising the most dust.

-15-

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Scottsboro Boy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Part One: - The Big Frame 1
  • Chapter 1 3
  • Chapter 2 10
  • Chapter 3 15
  • Chapter 5 21
  • Chapter 6 24
  • Chapter 7 30
  • Chapter 8 35
  • Chapter 9 44
  • Chapter II 57
  • Part Two: - Murderers' Home: 1937-1943 71
  • Chapter 1 73
  • Chapter 3 79
  • Chapter 4 85
  • Chapter 5 98
  • Chapter 6 102
  • Chapter 7 116
  • Chapter 10 140
  • Part Three - Kilby: 1943-1948 169
  • Chapter 3 190
  • Chapter 5 202
  • Chapter 6 208
  • Chapter 7 215
  • Timetable of Events in the Scottsboro Case 299
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