Scottsboro Boy

By Haywood Patterson; Earl Conrad | Go to book overview

A few days later, out in the field, John Peaseley jumped me again and said, "I talked to that boy yesterday and he said he didn't want to have anything more to do with you. I want you to let him alone." Then he raised his voice up high so the guards and the squad heard him, "You better not be caught in his face any more!'' That always meant a fight.

I didn't believe what Peaseley said. I told him I'd see my gal-boy about that. I would meet him after we got inside the prison. In there the guards wouldn't be able to stop a fight so quick.

He went back into camp that night and got himself a pair of shears somewhere. He put the shears in his pocket and went to his cell.

I had a switch-blade knife.

I went looking for him.

I found him up there in my kid's cell. He was sitting on the bunk talking to the kid.

I eased in on him with my knife cocked and up over my head. When John Peaseley looked up he saw me. I said, "Well, John, the devil's got you now. Don't you try to resist. Just take it easy and take what I'm going to give you. I'm going to put a lot of hell on you."

I didn't have to use my knife. I gave him a serious whupping. I beat on him like he was a snake. I kicked him with my heavy shoes.

Thereafter I didn't have any more trouble from him. He didn't try to take my gal-boy from me after that. Nobody did.

And Peaseley didn't try to make a girl out of me no more. Nobody did.

I had taken a gal-boy, whupped a wolf, and set myself up as a devil.


Chapter 3

IN front of the prison I had been working for several months. I noticed a couple of the other yard workers, they tried to be on the right side of the white yard sergeant, Captain Pluper. They bought

-85-

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Scottsboro Boy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Part One: - The Big Frame 1
  • Chapter 1 3
  • Chapter 2 10
  • Chapter 3 15
  • Chapter 5 21
  • Chapter 6 24
  • Chapter 7 30
  • Chapter 8 35
  • Chapter 9 44
  • Chapter II 57
  • Part Two: - Murderers' Home: 1937-1943 71
  • Chapter 1 73
  • Chapter 3 79
  • Chapter 4 85
  • Chapter 5 98
  • Chapter 6 102
  • Chapter 7 116
  • Chapter 10 140
  • Part Three - Kilby: 1943-1948 169
  • Chapter 3 190
  • Chapter 5 202
  • Chapter 6 208
  • Chapter 7 215
  • Timetable of Events in the Scottsboro Case 299
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