CHAPTER V
Keats's Personality, his World and an Experience

RICHARD ABBEY was a man of affairs, one who had practical interests beyond his business of tea-broking. He was a churchwarden at Walthamstow, twice Master of a City Company (the Patten Makers'), and in 1820 we find him recorded in The Times as one of the Stewards for the Annual Examination of the City of London National Schools in the Egyptian Hall, Mansion House ('dinner at 5 o'clock precisely').

In appearance Abbey was, according to John Taylor, 'a large stout goodnatured looking man with a great Piece of Benevolence standing out on the Top of his Forehead.' Unless the bump of Benevolence were merely delusive, this description of him would seem to support the view that, in his personal relations with his wards, he did what he conceived to be his duty, and not unkindly. It was Abbey's misfortune that in at least one of his wards he entertained an angel unawares. He was old-fashioned; up to 1827 still wearing the dress of his youth, 'white Cotton Stockings & Breeches & half Boots,--when for a long Time there had been no other Man on the Exchange in that Dress, & he was become so conspicuous for it as to be an object of attention in the Streets.'

To an elderly man with set ideas the care of four lively young people could not have been an easy one. He must have felt some relief that soon he would be quit of his eldest ward, John, now on the eve of his majority and fitted, by the expenditure of more than his share of the family money, for a prosperous career. Little Fanny was in the charge of his wife and the two younger boys under his eye in the counting- house at 4 Pancras Lane.

Partly to spite Hammond at Edmonton, and partly because the late Mrs. Jennings had been known and respected in the district, Abbey had determined that John should start a practice in the nearby village of Tottenham. 'He communicated his Plans to his Ward but his Surprize was not moderate to hear in Reply, that he did not intend to be a Surgeon.'

Taylor's report of Richard Abbey's words dramatizes the encounter between ward and guardian. The fat tradesman, secure in his authority and probably seated comfortably in a familiar armchair, and the vivid, beautiful boy standing before him.

"Not intend to be a Surgeon! Why, what do you mean to be?"

-52-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Life of John Keats
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 412

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.