CHAPTER VI
Haydon and the Elgin Marbles; Leigh Hunt (October, 1816-January, 1817)

CHARLES COWDEN CLARKE had fostered the early poetic growth of his pupil and it was appropriately he who first drew him into the liberal and artistic circle, prominent members of which were Leigh Hunt, poet, graceful prose-writer and editor of the rebel journal The Examiner, and Haydon the painter.

Some time in 1816 Cowden Clarke, in a glow of anticipation, took to Leigh Hunt some of the young Keats's poems. Knowing that there was merit in them he anticipated some measure of praise, but, he said, 'my partial spirit was not prepared for the unhesitating and prompt admiration which broke forth before he had read twenty lines of the first poem.' Hunt himself wrote: 'I shall never forget the impression made upon me by the exuberant specimens of genuine though young poetry that were laid before me.'

The praise of a man recognized by the younger generation as one of its most sensitive and discriminating critics was gratifying enough but, to Cowden Clarke's delight, it was endorsed by the harder-headed Horace Smith, wit and man of letters, who happened to be present. Among the poems was a sonnet written on the day Hunt left prison ( February 3rd, 1815) beginning: 'How many bards gild the lapses of time.' Hunt read the sonnet aloud and in reference to the thirteenth line, 'That distance of recognisance bereaves,' Smith exclaimed: 'What a well-condensed expression for a youth so young!' Horace Smith's opinion was soon to be echoed by William Godwin, Basil Montagu and Hazlitt, to whom Hunt introduced the poems as they dined with him.

On May 5th Hunt had published in The Examiner the first poem of Keats's to be printed, the sonnet, 'O Solitude! if I must with thee dwell.' This, he stated, had been published 'without knowing more of him than any other anonymous correspondent'; it would therefore appear that it was after this date that Cowden Clarke took the sheaf of poems to him. The evidence as to when Keats first met Hunt is conflicting. Mr. Blunden considers that it was not until late in 1816; but from a rimed invitation to visit him at No. 7 Pond Street, Hampstead (where he spent a fortnight or more in October), sent by Haydon to John Hamilton Reynolds,1 it would appear as if Keats met Haydon,

____________________
1
See The Keats Circle, p. 4, ed. H. E. Rollins, Harvard University Press, 1948.

-58-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Life of John Keats
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 412

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.