Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:


CHAPTER XVII
The Isle of Wight and Winchester (May-October, 1819)

WENTWORTH PLACE is not large. Dilke, in the fashionable phraseology of the day, described the two houses as cottages, but to us they are not that. The rooms are high and well proportioned. Excluding the basement, Brown's house had four and Dilke's five rooms. Dilke's two living-rooms were divided by folding-doors and could be thrown into one large enough in which to give a party. The house would just hold in comfort Mrs. Brawne and her three children; beside Fanny there were Sam, a boy of fourteen, and a little sister, Margaret. In 1838 the two houses were bought by Miss Chester, an actress who had formerly held the Court appointment of reader to George IV: she converted them into one house with the addition of a large drawing-room.

Wentworth Place, now the Keats Memorial House, is full of the peace and dignity of age, though tragedy has owned it. Keats was ill and unhappy within its walls; in 1828 Sam Brawne1 died there of the same disease; and in November, 1829, Mrs. Brawne came to a terrible end. Holding aloft a candle to light a friend out of the house, her dress caught fire and she died as the result of burns.

In the garden, the design of which is little altered since Keats's day, there are some fine old trees. The glory of them is a two hundred- years-old mulberry now supporting his great age with a crutch but still producing abundant fruit. The plum tree under which the 'Nightingale' Ode is said to have been written was still there until recently, an ivy-clad stump. Before the house grew a hedge of laurustinus, now replaced by a wooden fence. Water was obtained from a conduit which was recently uncovered in the course of drain repairs.

To a man in love the period of engagement is necessarily a trying one: to Keats, an ardently passionate man, the nearness of his beloved must have been almost unbearable. There are indications in his letters that she herself was not yet fully awakened to love. The response is often far slower in a woman and Fanny was young. Before his death she had learned to love him wholly.

Although his love for her inspired most of his finest work, Keats could not write when he was near her: work in some form or other was, apart from the creative urge within him, a necessity, as money was short. He would soon have temporarily to leave Wentworth Place

____________________
1
His grave is in St. Martin's Burial Ground, Camden Town.

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Life of John Keats
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 412

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.