SUGGESTED READINGS

The following readings are intended for readers who wish to pursue further studies, either in general or in particular topics. The references are mainly to printed works and, in the later portion, to government and other reports. These references will in turn lead on the inquiring student to the further sources of the subjects concerned.


GENERAL

The best-known standard history is the Cambridge History of India in six volumes. Five volumes were published between 1922 and 1932. Volume II, covering the first ten centuries of the Christian era, is being prepared by Professor A. L. Basham of London. There is a supplementary volume on the Indus civilization ( 1953) by Sir Mortimer-Wheeler. The volumes vary in merit. The best is the first. Vols. III and IV adopt the style of the Muslim chronicles they rest upon and Vols. V and VI are almost exclusively political and administrative. But all are weighty and equipped with extensive bibliographies. In India the Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan is publishing the History and Culture of the People in 10 volumes. The work is directed by Dr. K. M. Munshi, and the general editor is the veteran scholar Dr. R. C. Mazumdar. Special attention is paid to social and cultural aspects, and the six volumes so far published reveal the high standard of modern historical scholarship. These are the Vedic Age ( 1951), The Age of Imperial Unity ( 600 B.C.-300 A.D.) ( 1951), The Classical Age (320-750 A.D.) ( 1954), The Age of Imperial Kanauj (750-1000 A.D.) ( 1955), The Struggle for Empire (750-1200 A.D.) ( 1957), and The Delhi Sultanate ( 1960). The remaining volumes are likely to appear at regular intervals.

Of the many single-volume histories the following may be mentioned. The standard was set by Mountstuart Elphinstone History of India, which was first published in 1841 and achieved a reprint of the ninth edition ( London) in 1911. The Muslim section was based on the standard Muslim historians and set the dynastic framework of Indian history which has survived until recently. The best-known recent single-volume work is the Oxford History of India, originally written by Vincent Smith ( 1919). The third edition ( 1958) has been edited and the British section rewritten by Percival Spear. The Indian scholars R. C. Mazumdar, H. C. Raychandhuri, and K. K. Datta published an Advanced History of India ( London: Macmillan) in 1946. These two works may be said to represent modern British and Indian views of Indian history respectively, and they provide an interesting comparison. The Cambridge Shorter History of India ( 1934) is notable for an acute study of the British period by H. H. Dodwell. An original and challenging sketch is K. M. Panikkar Survey of Indian History, first published in 1946. A

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