Environmental Regulations and Corporate Strategy: A NAFTA Perspective

By Alan Rugman; John Kirton et al. | Go to book overview

10
Trade and Environment Regimes in Operation: The North American Auto Industry

Beyond the realms of dispute settlement, management, and prevention lie the instruments for regulatory communication, capacity building, convergence, and coalition building offered by the new NAFTA regime. As the centre of the new era of complex institutional responsiveness, it offers improved mechanisms to combat environmental regulatory protectionism when conflicts erupt between firms, governments, and environmental non-government organizations ( ENGOs). Equally importantly, the NAFTA regime provides instruments of proactive cooperation, aimed at reducing regulatory barriers before conflicts arise. These create a wider regulatory regime that directly strengthens firms' competitiveness through international commerce, while simultaneously protecting and enhancing the natural environment.

The activities of firms and governments in the North American automotive industry in the lead-up to, and during the first five years of operation of, NAFTA show many of these new cooperative instruments being created and employed. The variety and vigour with which automotive firms are mobilizing these instruments reflect the fact that the conditions of complex institutional responsiveness are most advanced in this sector. The 'big three' North American assemblers built on the highly integrated regional production system they first constructed in the 1960s across the US-Canadian border, to move towards partnerships on a global scale, as the 1998 Chrysler-Daimler Benz merger shows. It is in this industry that many of the new techniques of just-in-time inventory and lean production were first pioneered.

Automobiles, and their impacts on the atmosphere through emissions from their operation, have long been at the forefront of the move to more stringent environmental regulation in North America, Europe, and Asia ( Vogel 1995). As the dominant industry sector in the North American manufacturing economy, the automotive industry is the subject of many of the most important changes in the new NAFTA regime.

The firms in the North American automotive industry have focused their energies in the post-NAFTA era on the highly cooperative end of the array of instruments that complex institutional responsiveness allows. Firms have not primarily looked to national governments to settle, manage, or prevent their international disputes, nor even to NAFTA's intergovernmental institutions to assist in this process or lead the way in regulatory convergence. Rather, the firms have preferred anticipatory private

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Environmental Regulations and Corporate Strategy: A NAFTA Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.