The Message Is the Medium: Online All the Time for Everyone

By Tom Koch | Go to book overview

obstacles. This is the beginning of the new age of electronic journalism, one that frees provider and user alike to search far and wide for the best answer to a problem at hand. It is the first step toward a new balance between information seeker and data resource. The old equation was static, with fixed roles up and down the lines of transmission. The new balance is dynamic and fluid, defined by the new electronic conference center and library described in the next chapter.


NOTES
1.
Tom Koch, The News as Myth: Fact and Context in Journalism. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1990.
2.
Joseph Ungaro. "First the Bad News." Media Studies Journal. Fall, 1991, 100-113.
3.
Rogert Fidler. "Mediamorphosis, or The Transformation of Newspapers into a New Medium." Media Studies Journal. Fall, 1991, 115-125 (p. 118).
4.
Jeff Ubois. "The Karma of Chameleon," Internet. October, 1994, 60.
5.
Reuters. "U.S. On-line Subscribers Rise." Toronto Star. November 1, 1994.
6.
Cathryn Conroy. "News You Can Choose: Nonstop Global Coverage Delivered Online." Online Today 8:1 ( January, 1989), 16-21.
7.
Robert Maynard Hutchins. In: A Free and Responsible Press, Robert D. Leigh , Ed. University of Chicago, 1947; reprinted, 1974.
8.
Fredreic F. Endres. "Daily Newspaper Utilization of Computer Data Bases". Newspaper Research Journal 7:1 (Fall, 1985), 34.
9.
John Eichorn, et. al. "Standards for Patient Monitoring During Anesthesia at Harvard Medical School." Journal of the American Medical Association 256 ( 1986), 1017-1020.
10.
C. Whitcher, et. al. "Anesthetic Mishaps and the Cost of Monitoring: A Proposed Standard for Monitoring Equipment." Journal of Clinical Monitoring. January 4, 1988.
11.
Martha Robinson. "No Guidelines in Boy's Death." [Vanocouver] Sun. May 30, 1980.
12.
Tom Koch. The News as Myth, Ch. 4. Also see, Tom Koch, Journalism for the 21st Century. New York: Praeger, 1993.
13.
Charles B. Inlander, Lowell S. Levin, Ed Weiner. Medicine on Trial. New York: Pantheon, 1988, 50-66.
14.
This argument is made at length in Tom Koch. The News as Myth.
15.
"Group Account Manager Undergoes Heart Transplant And Experiences Adverse Reaction To Medication." Paperchase Pulse 3:1, 1990.
16.
Cathryn Conroy. "Making a Solid Case for Common Sense." CompuServe Magazine. December 8, 1991.
17.
Journalist software, an automatic clipping program that uses multicolumn, news-style pages for the delivery of data, is sold by PED Software Corporation, Cupertino, California.

-33-

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The Message Is the Medium: Online All the Time for Everyone
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Medium is the Message" and Other Myths of the Evolving, Electronic Age" 1
  • Notes 13
  • 2 - Old News: The Necessity for Change 15
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - Everybody's Resource: The Knowledge Center 35
  • Notes 54
  • 4 55
  • Notes 75
  • 5 - Finding It: The Organization of Online Material 77
  • Note 99
  • 6 - The Internet: Fact and Context 101
  • Notes 123
  • 7 - Mute Dialogues: Hope and Despair Online 125
  • Notes 146
  • 8 - Virtual" Realities:" 147
  • 9 165
  • Note 184
  • 10 - Quality: Fact and Opinion 185
  • 11 201
  • Notes 219
  • Selected Bibliography 221
  • Index 225
  • About the Author 229
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