How Credit-Money Shapes the Economy: The United States in a Global System

By Robert Guttmann | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people have shaped my thinking on the subject of money and helped me formulate my ideas in this book. I would like to thank in particular Robert Boyer, Suzanne de Brunhoff, Robert Delorme, Alain Lipietz, Marty Kenner, Pascal Petit, Bruce Steinberg, and my colleagues at both Hofstra University and the Université de Paris-Nord for the patience and guidance they have given me. Without their contribution over the years I would not have been able to write this book. I have also greatly benefited from participation in the Columbia University Seminar on monetary and financial reform organized by Professor Albert Hart. Having access to some of the greatest thinkers in the field, such as Al himself, Hyman Minsky, Stephen Rousseas, Robert Mundell, and many others, has had a profound effect on my thinking and, by extension, on the book. I would like to thank Columbia University Seminars and Professor Aaron Warner for allowing this work to be published in their series and for the generous support they have provided me. Finally, I would like to express my deeply felt gratitude to Richard Bartel of M. E. Sharpe, Inc., whose support and insights have been invaluable.

-xxiii-

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