Cognitive Work Analysis: Toward Safe, Productive, and Healthy Computer-Based Work

By Kim J. Vicente | Go to book overview

9
Phase 3: Strategies Analysis

Heuristic strategies can be highly accurate in some environments, but no single heuristic does well across all contexts. This suggests that if a decision maker wanted to achieve both a reasonably high level of accuracy and low effort, he or she should have to use a repertoire of strategies, with selection contingent upon situational demands. -- J. W. Payne et. al. ( 1993, p. 131)

To support system design we do not need detailed process models of the mental activities which are used by the operators. System design must be based upon higher level models of the structures of effective mental processes which the operators can be used and their characteristics with respect to human limitations and preferences so that operators can adapt individually and develop effective strategies. Rather than descriptions of the course and content of actual mental processes, we need descriptions of the structures of possible and effective mental processes. -- Rasmussen ( 1981, p. 242)


PURPOSE

Our objective in this chapter is to describe the third phase of CWA, strategies analysis, in full detail. As we discussed in chapter 5, the value added by strategies analysis lies in understanding the different ways of accomplishing the activities identified in a control task analysis. Thus, whereas the previous chapter dealt with the question of what needs to be done, this chapter deals with the question of how it can be done. We describe information flows maps ( Rasmussen, 1980, 1981) as a modeling tool that can be used to conduct such an analysis. A detailed example of the strategies analysis is then presented for the DURESS II process control microworld. By the end of this chapter, you should understand how strategy constraints inherit, and built on, the work domain and control task constraints discussed in the previous two chapters.


STRATEGIES ANALYSIS: WHAT IS IT AND WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

We begin by showing the relationship between strategies analysis and control task analysis. Then, we use an example from air traffic control to show why workers often switch between several strategies to cope with task demands. This intuition- building example is followed by a generic definition of the term strategy. This definition helps to illustrate the importance of strategies analysis in CWA.

-215-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cognitive Work Analysis: Toward Safe, Productive, and Healthy Computer-Based Work
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.