Teaching and Learning Computer Programming: Multiple Research Perspectives

By Richard E. Mayer | Go to book overview

high-road transfer. To this end, research might attempt to determine whether or not procedural computer programming is the best way, amongst multiple methods, to achieve cognitive skill transfer. Perhaps we will see future studies where cognitive-skill transfer results due to procedural computer programming environments are compared with the results of other approaches (including nonprocedural computer programming) to the same problem.

The studies and thinking presented in this volume point to major new directions in educational computing research. They serve to advance our knowledge about the conditions under which successful teaching of programming and transfer of cognitive skills occur. These research pieces will undoubtedly help, in important ways, to set the educational computing research agenda.


REFERENCES

Johanson, R. P. ( 1988). "Computers, cognition, and curriculum: Retrospect and prospect". Journal of Educational Computing Research, 4, 1-30.

Papert, S. ( 1980). Mindstorms: Children, computers and powerful ideas. New York: Basic Books.

Papert, S. ( 1987). Computer criticism vs. technocentric thinking. Educational Researcher, 16, 22-30.

Salomon, G. ( 1988). "Al in reverse: Computer tools that turn cognitive". Journal of Educational Computing Research, 4, 123-139.

Salomon, G., & Perkins, D. N. ( 1987). "Transfer of cognitive skills from programming: When and how?" Journal of Educational Computing Research, 3, 149-170.

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