Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

Video in digital storys: a new approach for team integration and knowledge management in business context

Josephine Hofmann

Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitwirtschaft und Organisation


1 Knowledge Management today

Knowledge Management is a booming subject in today's management discussion and literature. It is clear that tomorrow's success is depending more and more on the appropriate management of knowledge in heads, databases, or documents. Market forecasts see in the business with respective technological solutions and consulting services a multimillion market ( Sheina Madan / Woods Eric 1998). Conferences, forums and management guides are just about to make the topic prominent. After the age of the information society we are now entering the knowledge society, the knowledge economy.

A look in the practice shows a certain gap between public disucssion and enterprises daily practice: Today's reality in companies is focussing strongly on the "externalisation" of knowledge -- getting knowledge out of the individual's heads, into sophisticated databases. "Lessons learned" is one keyword being used. But all too often the question, which knowledge, which lessons in which form is worth being stored at all, and, if yes, in what form, is not dealt with in an adequate manner. By this, the quality of the starting material is not always proofed. This leads to new data cemetries, perfectly organised, but not really useful. Simply making knowledge available rarely results in ist use! Also, this approach leads to the quick delegation of knowledge management issues to IT- staff -- and, by this, forgets all too often that also training staff, personnel specialists and representatives of differents departments should be involved. Knowledge management is a matter for a multitude of responsible persons -- and not only an IT-matter.

-217-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1364

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.