Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

state the parameters of acceptable conversational topics. Users have also been observed exhibiting behavioural conventions that are not written and posted ( Jeffrey and Mark 1999). In general, netiquettes outline guidelines for the actual status of debate within the community with respect to the code of conduct that administrators would like applied. They give recommendation for fair and polite communication. Most rules seem to be reactionary, based on experiences that have occurred previously within virtual environments.


2.1 Environmental specifics

On the Internet, two kinds of environments could be differentiated with respect to the action provided by affordances ( Pankoke-Babatz 1999). Asynchronous media support time dispersed communication through the distribution of text- messages (i.e. Email, newsgroups, mailing lists) and synchronous media which provide virtual locations for real-time social interaction (i.e. Chatrooms, MUDS, virtual worlds).

Netiquettes refer generally to a code of conduct (i.e. 'don't SHOUT', 'be polite', 'avoid disruptive behaviour'). We found that the degree to which these rules of politeness are applied and enforced can be environmentally specific. For example, multi-user newsgroups may have recommendations that must be applicable to the newsgroup population, and may differ between newsgroups. The bilateral relationship of Email may only require the following of conventions acceptable between sender and receiver ( Rospach 1996; YOYO 1997).


2.2 Rules for prevention of disruptive behaviour

A major difference between real world and Internet communication is that the Internet provides the possibility of non-physical and anonymous contacts. This anonymity may provide people with the opportunity to lower their inhibitions and create the potential for unregulated, abusive behaviour ( Reid 1991). From studying the rule sets, we will comment on three areas of disruptive behaviour: spamming, flaming and gender swapping.

Spamming is the process where individuals post identical messages to different newsgroups sometimes with the intent of purposely disrupting ongoing discussions. It also may mean sending mass copies of unsolicited Email to multiple addresses. This action makes it more difficult for receivers to separate personal Email from 'junk mail' and maintain on-topic, relevant newsgroup discussions. It may also result in local technical problems such as storage overflow and slow response. Flaming is a public personal attack against another user (i.e. calling another user names). The absence of a social mechanism to correct the behaviour and the anonymity of the abusers, may lead to flaming that is initially amusing to bystanders but can quite rapidly get out of control.

-315-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1364

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.