Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview
applied efficiently in evolving contexts. The second set is the distinction between background knowledge and foreground knowledge. Foreground knowledge is that which is necessary for problem-solving in a given context. Background knowledge is that which supports the application of foreground knowledge, and which is typically provided by colleges and universities.
THE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT PROBLEM
From a knowledge management viewpoint three important questions are:
what is the best configuration of knowledge across the supply chain?
how should it optimise the growth of knowledge?
what is the relative value of different classes of knowledge?
A remark from an IT manager in an automotive company puts these in context:

"In 50 years' time, we will be designing products we don't know, incorporating materials which haven't been invented, made in processes yet to be defined, by people we have not yet recruited."

Consider the growing complexity of supply chains. For example; an automotive assembler has about 50 different engine sets for its vehicles, sourced locally. In less than a decade, this will rise to some 500 different sets, sourced globally. Increasing complexity brings increasing problems ( Gregg, 1996)
The range and functionality of goods is increasing
Product lifetimes are shorter
Buyers expect products to be 'ready-to-use' with full support.
Environmental legislation requires more complex supply chains
There are many more linked processes involved
Cross-linkages between these processes are manifold and increasing
More organisations of different kinds are involved in these supply chains
The knowledge requirement to manage this is expanding exponentially.

Clearly, one must attend not only to the quality and extent of knowledge that an organisation has, but in an evolving competitive context, one must also manage its lifecycle (capture, dissemination, and retirement). Hence, the management of knowledge becomes a critical, core competence of the organisation. Knowledge management must include education; the mere provision of IT infrastructures and knowledge mapping software will be insufficient for the future.


MANAGEMENT OF THE KNOWLEDGE LIFECYCLE

Because of space limitations, we outline some of the important issues and then, without further consideration we discuss emergent 'best practice'.

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