Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

2 Preliminary experiments in a nursery school

Preliminary experiments were conducted a nursery school that has an enrollment of about 200 children ranging in age from one to five years of age. The school has about thirty teachers and helpers. Thirty-eight five-year-olds were chosen for the preliminary experiments as well as two teachers and two support staff. The support staff designed the curriculum. We used two PCs and a SOFTBOARD. The results from experiments can be summarized into three points as follows. The first is that children are good at cooperative work (pairs or groups of three) because groups allow one child to work as a producer and the others to work as operators. The second is that cooperation between the children and the support staff is an important factor in maintaining the children's concentration. The third point concerns time. We found that the best format was morning class.


3 Making animated stories with group work

Based on the results of the preliminary experiments, we started new experiments with five-member groups. The experimental procedure is as follows: First, the children draw contours of their characters or objects on the SOFTBOARD. They then produce a line drawing that is colored using the computer. After all children have finished, they record the sound and describe the type of action desired. The support staff then construct a simple movie based on the children's instructions. In the second step, each group makes a picture-story show with four sheets of colored paper as a story-board. After finishing one sheet, the children have to explain their drawings to the teachers or support staff, who write down the content. Children are encouraged to keep drawing until the end of their story. In the third and final step, each group makes an electronic picture-story show based on their story-board. The children draw characters and objects using the SOFTBOARD and computers. The staff digitize the shows as simple static images on the computers, and then show the movie to the children. The children's verbal story lines are recorded as sound data. Next, the story is animated based on each group's story-board by the support staff.


3.1 Analysis of kids ability and experience with computer

We have been conducting experiments with 40 five-year olds one day a week since May 1998. First, we had the children make picture stories so we could examine how they drew pictures with a computer and created stories. Next step was to introduce a new instrument called "SOFTBOARD", to input line data and trace line data. It is easier for children to draw with SOFTBOARD than

-363-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1364

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.