Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design

By Hans-Jörg Bullinger; Jürgen Ziegler | Go to book overview

( Weber 1999): (i) How to find representative delegates of the target group(s) for participation in the design process? (ii) Does the tele-communication system optimally recognise all relevant factors that have an influence on the users' willingness and ability to use the system for tele-communication purposes? (iii) Is the system able to be easily adapted or to adapt to changes in the organisational structure or to individual characteristics during runtime? and (iv) Is the system efficient? These questions will be picked up as central themes of the next section.


4 Design Considerations

Participation of members of the prospected target group is crucial for system design. At the very beginning, a case study was launched to analyse the communication behaviour of (some) BLISS users. Three user and their carers were involved. The results of interviews proved that BLISS users communicate only with a few persons. Impatience of potential communication partners or a much higher interest in BLISS (as a language) instead than in the message itself often had frustrating effects on BLISS users, so they restricted themselves to a small group of persons to communicate with. Even this small sample indicated that a much wider participation of BLISS users is necessary to recognise the variety of needs. As a conclusion, a testing environment is necessary that can be used by distributed, most often immobile participants.

Next, considerations about relevant factors that might hinder persons to use a BLISS tele-communication system are necessary. First, if the system does not sufficiently support communication or is not user-friendly (e.g., poor ergonomics), acceptance is not likely. Individual characteristics of the users, e.g., physiological, psychological or cognitive aspects as well as qualification need also intensive inspection. Furthermore, organisational characteristics of prospective contexts of use, e.g., privacy needs, required resources or physical environments, influence the design of a tele-communication system.

Adaptability due to changing needs at runtime is another important topic. E.g., users who are in the process of learning BLISS have a steadily growing vocabulary which has to be mirrored by the communication system. Therefore, individual BLISS boards are necessary that can be easily adapted and expanded. Also, if the social environment of a user changes new topics of interest may arise. On the other side, individual strategies to select symbols during sentence composition should be supported. Whereas speaking users, e.g., prefer a semantic tree structure starting

-804-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Human-Computer Interaction: Communication, Cooperation, and Application Design
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1364

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.