THE MEN OF ZANZIBAR

WHEN his hunting trip in Uganda was over, Hemingway shipped his specimens and weapons direct from Mombasa to New York, but he himself journeyed south over the few miles that stretched to Zanzibar.

On the outward trip the steamer had touched there, and the little he saw of the place had so charmed him that all the time he was on safari he promised himself he would not return home without revisiting it. On the morning he arrived he had called upon Harris, his consul, to inquire about the hotel; and that evening Harris had returned his call and introduced him at the club.

One of the men there asked Hemingway what brought him to Africa, and when he answered simply and truthfully that he had come to shoot big game, it was as though he had said something clever, and every one smiled. On the way back to the hotel, as they felt their way through the narrow slits in the wall that served as streets, he asked the consul why every one had smiled.

The consul laughed evasively.

-92-

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The Lost Road
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • The Lost Road 1
  • The Miracle of Las Palmas 30
  • Evil to Him Who Evil Thinks 61
  • The Men of Zanzibar 92
  • The Long Arm 137
  • The God of Coincidence 157
  • The Buried Treasure of Cobre 189
  • The Boy Scout 245
  • Somewhere in France 271
  • The Man Who Had Everything 308
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