Crime and Punishment in Jewish Law: Essays and Responsa

By Walter Jacob; Moshe Zemer | Go to book overview

The question of donations from people of doubtful reputation or those having a criminal record has also arisen a number of times. It was always felt that such gifts should be accepted, especially as it is a mitzvah to support a synagogue and it would be a sin to hinder its performance. There were objections to temple sacrifices by criminals, but these objections were not transferred to the synagogue ( Toldot Adam V'Havah, Havah23.1: Shulhan Arukh Orah Hayim152.31 and commentaries). However, there was an equally strong feeling that individuals of dubious reputation should not be honored; marit ayin and the honor of the synagogue are involved here.

It is, therefore, clear that although there is a strong tradition for memorializing the deceased through plaques, we should not mention a convicted felon by name. We might affix a plaque which read, "Given by in memory of his dear brother," without the specific name. We should not go further than this.


Garnisheeing Wages

Contemporary Reform Responsa (Cincinnati, 1974), ♯57

Solomon B. Freehof

QUESTION: If the court orders the wages due to an employee to be garnisheed, and the employer is Jewish, has the employer the moral and religious duty to resist the court order, since the Bible prohibits withholding the wages of an employee? (Asked by Rabbi Joshua O. Haberman, Washington, D.C.)

ANSWER: The Bible is specific in prohibiting the withholding of wages due to an employee (see Leviticus 19:13 and Deuteronomy 24:16). If, for example, the employee is a day-by-day laborer, he must be paid on the very day that his work is finished. This law is developed in full detail in the Talmud in Baba Metzia from 110b to

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Crime and Punishment in Jewish Law: Essays and Responsa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 142

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.