Philosophies of Music History

By Warren Dwight Allen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
SEQUENTIAL PATTERNS SUMMARIZED

THEIR INFLUENCE ON MUSIC EDUCATION

I. A FEW QUOTANONS

THE TWO previous chapters have attempted a difficult task, one that may yet need further clarification and qualification, in future studies or by abler hands. That task is to get at the historical meaning of certain terms, words which have been used in philosophies of music history. If the attempt has been fairly successful, then the assumptions involved in the quotations which follow may be more clearly isolated and defined. These quotations have been located since the preceding chapters were written. Like many others which might have been chosen, they each epitomize some phase of the philosophy of music history in terms of development, progress, or evolution. Objections will be summarized in pp. 292-302 of this chapter.


1. PROGRESS, meaning DEVELOPMENT

"The perusal of Chronological Tables illustrating the history of music . . . enables the lover of music to obtain in a short time a comprehensive and clear view of the gradual development of the art from the earliest period of its cultivation recorded in history to the present day. . . . There is no disconnection in the progress of an art. . . .

"He (Czerny) gives an account of the music of the nations before the Christian era, of the music of our forefathers during the Middle Ages, and of the rise of our modern tone-art. This Section is arranged in eighteen Periods." [91], pp. 171-172.


2. PROGRESS, meaning IMPROVEMENT

"Just as the compositions of Pergolesi, of Handel, of Leo, etc., are infinitely above Carissimi's and Corelli's, so our good French masters are very superior to those admired at the end of the last century."1

____________________
1
Quoted from Cahuzac by Wanda Landowska in Music of the Past, N. Y., Knopf, 1924; a lively rejoinder to doctrines of Progress.

-286-

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