The Clinton Legacy

By Colin Campbell; Bert A. Rockman | Go to book overview

7
Clinton and Organized Interests: Splitting Friends, Unifying Enemies

MARK A. PETERSON

Although nowhere mentioned in the Constitution, organized interests are as much a core feature of American politics and governance as the presidency, Congress, and courts. Some observers have even dubbed them the fourth branch of government. To any president they represent both a challenge to and an opportunity for the exercise of leadership. Interest groups expose presidents to the threat of mobilized opposition to their agendas. They can exacerbate the difficulty of governing in a system embodying abundant veto points created by constitutionally "separate institutions sharing powers," in Richard Neustadt's classic characterization, as well as a bicameral legislature and sovereign states. At the same time, precisely because successful leadership in the United States is predicated upon the continuous building of supporting coalitions in a number of institutional venues, organized interests can serve as beneficial allies of presidents. Working in concert with the White House, their ties to other elected officials and capacity to mobilize constituencies can be used to forge winning alliances that bridge the institutional divides of American government. As either adversaries or collaborators of the president, interest groups cannot be ignored, nor can their relationship with the presidency be viewed in isolation from other elements of presidential coalition-building strategies.

By the time Bill Clinton took the oath of office, these verities of the modern presidency were well understood by both his Republican and his Democratic pre

-140-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Clinton Legacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.