Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
ii. elaborate system of diplomatic etiquette.
iii. elaborate technical terminology, for example--treaty, convention, agreement, protocol, démarche, ultimatum, note, note verbale, representations, pourparlers, entente, détente, alliance, rapprochement, recognition de facto and de jure, ratification, casus belli, casus foederis, status quo, etc.
b. Secret diplomacy, ranging from informal secret "conversations" to formal secret treaties of alliance.
c. Wide scope of subjects dealt with by diplomacy, for example-- concessions to build railways or prospect for oil, compensation for injuries suffered by individuals, location of boundaries, regulation of opium traffic, postal agreements, extradition of criminals, etc.
2. International conflicts.
a. Habitual use of threats to support diplomatic policies, for example --naval demonstrations, mobilization, ultimatums.
b. Severance of diplomatic relations as a relatively grave manifestation of displeasure, often a prelude to war.
c. Armed intervention, reprisals, boycotts, etc., without declaration of war.
d. War as the ultima ratio.
3. International administrative cooperation (treated in detail in Part 10).
a. Exemplified in numerous existing public international unions, commissions, and bureaus, and in private international associations.
b. Largely lacking in contentious matters about which international economic conflicts arise, for instance--oil concessions.
4. Unofficial international relations--private trade, travel, etc.

II. FUNDAMENTAL REALITIES
UNDERLYING INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

A. GEOGRAPHIC REALITIES.
References:--# Brunhes, Human Geography. Brunhes and Vallaux, La Géographie de l'histoire. # George, Relations of Geography and History. Holdich, Political Frontiers and Boundary Making. Fleure, Human Geography in Western Europe. Favignière, Geography and World Power. Semple, Influences of Geographic Environment. Lieut.-Col. L. Martin, The New Geography (convenient selected bibliography of maps and books).
1. Geographic divisions and political boundaries: are states natural geographic units?

Note: At this point it is necessary only to raise this question, not to settle it. To be more concrete, one may ask: Is Great Britain a geographic unit? Is Canada more closely connected with Great Britain than with the U. S.? Is the Rhine a natural frontier for France? Is there a geographic reason why Maine and California should belong to the same nation? (See also Part Two, II, B.)

2. Land and people.

Note: This section may be developed ad lib., but is intended only as a preliminary discussion to stimulate interest and provoke thought.

-4-

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