Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
4. Intensification of nationalism during war.
5. Enshrinement of exploits and heroes of past wars in song, oration, poem, and pageant, in monument and memorial, as highest examples of national patriotic devotion.
6. This attitude, however natural and justifiable, as an obstacle to plans for the abolition of war.

VII. THE QUESTION OF CONTROL

A. NATIONALISM A COMPLEX PHENOMENON, AS ABOVE INDICATED.

B. DIVERSE ELEMENTS AND MANIFESTATIONS OF NATIONALISM NOT ALWAYS MUTUALLY CONSISTENT AND LOGICAL, BECAUSE NATIONALISM IS COMPOSITE OF MANY IDEAS AND EMOTIONS, as shown in II, above.

C. SOME OF THE IDEAS AND TENDENCIES FREQUENTLY CONNECTED WITH NATIONALISM DANGEROUS, as shown in sections III-VI, above.

D. PROBLEM FOR CONSIDERATION: IS RATIONAL CRITICISM AND CONTROL OF THE TROUBLE-MAKING ASPECTS OF NATIONALISM DESIRABLE OR FEASIBLE?
1. Necessity for rational control of emotional and instinctive impulses in private life (e.g., control of appetite, control of anger, control of speed mania in automobilists) as an analogous problem, perhaps suggesting proper attitude toward nationalism.
2. Uselessness of emotional and extreme reactions either for or against nationalism: Nationalism too deeply rooted in men's hearts and minds to be destroyed or "abolished" by radical anti-nationalists; and too strong to need uncritical emotional defense--hence the problem, if there is one, is a problem of rational control.

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