Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
i. Probable great increase of world's production.
ii. Possible Asiatic competition with more expensive European and American labor.
iii. Possible rebellion of natives against European employers.
5. Effect on non-European peoples.
a. Inhumane exploitation of natives in many cases.
b. Partial Europeanization in culture.
c. Gradual economic and political Europeanization.

II. HISTORICAL AND ECONOMIC BACKGROUND
References:--( Moon, ch. ii). * Hayes, II, 547-550. * Viallate, v-18. Culbertson, 2-6. Robinson, British Empire, chs. ii, vii, ix, xi. Valentin, 1-17. Wright, Romance of Colonisation. Beer, Old Colonial System. Bruce, Broadstone of Empire. # Schuyler, "Rise of Anti-Imperialism in England", Pol. Sci. Quart., XXXVII, 440-471, and "The Climax of Anti- Imperialism in England", Pol. Sci. Quart., XXXVI, 537-560. Pratt, Rise of Rail Power in War and Conquest. Leroy-Beaulieu, première partie, livre premier. Lenin, Der Imperialismus. Grunzel, Economic Protectionism. Fisk and Peirce, International Commercial Policies, chs. i-iv. General references above.
A. INSIGNIFICANCE OF EUROPE IN RELATION TO THE WORLD, PRIOR TO 15TH CENTURY.

B. FIRST PHASE OF EUROPEAN EXPANSION, FROM 15TH TO 18TH CENTURY
(mere summary intended).
1. Economic aspects.
a. Belief of monarchs and statesmen, in 16th and 17th centuries, that colonies, shipping, and commerce were desirable for strong economic-military state.
b. Eighteenth century mercantilism as a refinement of this idea in light of economic progress.
i. Improved transportation, making commerce in bulky goods profitable.
ii. Increased manufactures of Western Europe, seeking markets.
iii. Difficulty of finding European markets for manufactures produced in most countries.
iv. Hence desire for monopolistic control of colonial markets.
v. Emphasis on precious metals, hence desire to obtain bullion and raw materials from colonies.
vi. Emphasis on shipping and sea-power.
2. Importance of non-economic factors, especially:
a. Religion.
b. Ambition of national monarchs.
c. Spirit of adventure.
3. Collapse of the old mercantilist system.
a. Destruction of French colonial empire, 1763.
b. Disruption of English colonial empire, 1783.
c. Revolt of Spanish-American colonies, c. 1810-24.

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