Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview

E. ITALY.
1. Disappointment at French seizure of Tunis, 1881.
2. Unsuccessful imperialism of Depretis and Crispi in 1880's and 1890's.
3. Popular enthusiasm for imperialism in 20th century.

F. RUSSIA.
1. Historic tendency to eastward expansion.
2. Historic pressure toward Constantinople.
3. Intensification of these policies in 19th and 20th centuries.

G. OTHER IMPERIALIST NATIONS.
1. Netherlands and the retention of an old empire.
2. Portugal's attempt to rebuild her colonial empire in Africa.
3. Spain's efforts to retain fragments of empire.
4. Japan's imperialism in the Far East.
5. Imperialist tendencies of the United States (see below).

IV. DYNAMICS OF IMPERIALISM
References:--( Moon, ch. iv). * Hayes, II, 550-560. * Lippmann, Stakes of Diplomacy, ch. xi. * Woolf, Economic Imperialism, 15-36. # Woolf, Empire and Commerce, ch. iii. # Hobson, Imperialism. # Townsend , chs. ii-v. # Earle, Turkey, the Great Powers, and the Bagdad Railway, chs. iii, v, vi. Patton, The Business of Missions. Speer, Missions and Modern History. Pavlovitch, Foundations of Imperialist Policy. Lenin, Der Imperialismus. Leroy-Beaulieu, deuxième partie, livre premier. Von Hagen , 1-41. Zimmermann and other general references. Interesting source material in biographies such as those of Sir Harry Johnston, David Livingstone, H. M. Stanley, C. R. Flint, Karl Peters.
A. ACTIVE INTEREST-GROUPS.
1. Business groups.
a. Exporters and their subsidiaries--especially cotton and steel groups. (Analyze exports of England to India as shown by Statesman's Year Book or Statistical Abstract.)
b. Importers and their subsidiaries (Analyze imports of England from Egypt and India; of U. S. from Philippines).
c. Certain manufacturing interests.
i. Industries dependent on colonial markets or raw materials.
ii. Armament and affiliated industries.
iii. Makers of uniforms, telegraph and railway material, and other supplies directly used by government in colonies.
d. Shipping interests.
e. Investors and bankers--for example, Deutsche Bank.
2. Military and naval groups--advocates of imperialism for strategic defense, acquisition of naval bases, etc.
3. Colonial officials and their families--Sir Harry Johnston, Lord Milner, etc.
4. Missionaries--e.g.,Livingstone, Fabri.
5. Adventurers--e.g.,Rajah Brooke in Sarawak.

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