Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
2. Use of mobilization as a threat in diplomatic disputes.
a. Meaning of mobilization.
b. Examples.
i. Mobilization of Serbian army against Austria in Bosnian crisis of 1908-9 (details of crisis later).
ii. Mobilization of British army against Boers in franchise dispute in 1899 (above, Part 3).
iii. Mobilization of Russian and Austrian armies in Balkan crisis of 1913 (below, Part 5).
iv. Mobilization of Russian army in crisis of July, 1914 (below, Part 5).
3. Mobilization as an obstacle to peaceful conciliation.
a. Importance of speed in mobilization, especially in case of Germany before 1914.
b. Psychological effect of mobilization.
c. Russian mobilization in 1914 as Germany's reason for declaring war.
4. Difficulty of correlating military and diplomatic policies and neglect of such correlation. (See Oliver, Ordeal by Battle; N. Angell, The Dangers of Half-Preparedness; Mahan, op. cit.)

C. TENDENCY TO OVER-CONFIDENCE IN ARMAMENTS.
1. Lack of accurate information among common people as to relative strength of armaments.
2. Tendency to be either unduly pessimistic and panicky, or unduly optimistic and confident, regarding one's own army and navy.
3. Illustration of danger--German confidence in 1914 and its result.

D. GROWTH OF SPIRIT OF MILITARISM.

V. EFFECTS DURING THE GREAT WAR
References:--* Enock, 60-88. # C. J. H. Hayes, Brief History of the Great War, esp. chs. ii, iii, ix, xiii. W. McPherson, Short History of the Great War. P. Azan, Warfare of Today. G. White and H. Harper, Aircraft in the Great War. D. W. Johnson, Battlefields of the World War. J. Pierrefeu, Plutarch Lied. C. R. Gibson, War Inventions. I. F. Marcossen , The Business of War. E. Middleton, The Kingdom of the Air. R. Recouly, Foch. W. Churchill, The World Crisis. Compare references on war in Part 6.
A. ADVANTAGE OF MILITARY AND NAVAL PREPAREDNESS, IN EARLY STAGES OF WAR.
1. German ability to invade France.
2. British ability to dominate the seas.

B. LESSENED ADVANTAGE, IN LATER STAGES.
1. Ability of Britain and United States to raise and train armies, given sufficient time.
2. Necessity for unexpected changes in equipment and methods, after beginning of war.
a. Armies of 1914 not trained and equipped for intensive trench warfare.

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Syllabus on International Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 280

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.