Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview

PART SEVEN
SUMMARY REVIEW OF POLICIES
OF GREAT POWERS

I. THE BRITISH EMPIRE
References:-- * Bowman, The New World, ch. ii. Ward and Gooch, Cambridge History of British Foreign Policy, III (standard treatment). N. W. Rowell, British Empire and World Peace, part 2. Kennedy, Old Diplomacy and New. J. A. Farrer, England Under Edward VII. Foreign Affairs, Mar., 1923, 69-84. Current articles in "Round Table" (quarterly). E. Grigg, The Greatest Experiment in History. Other references, Part 5 and Part 3-XV-A.
A. IMPERIALISM (compare Part 3-XV-A).

B. INDUSTRIALISM (compare N. Angell, If Britain Is to Live).
1. Inability of Great Britain to support population by agriculture; hence importance of raw materials and markets for British industrial population.
2. Hence importance of preserving empire, and persistent tendency of imperialists (especially in Unionist Party) to advocate imperial tariff preference.
3. Conflicting interests as regards Europe.
A. Necessity of prosperous Europe (N.B. Germany and Russia) as market for British manufactures, hence:
I. Tendency to advocate leniency toward Germany, to permit German economic recovery.
II. Restoration of trade relations, and then of diplomatic relations with Russia, despite French opposition.
B. Fear of industrial rivalry.
9. Pre-war jealousy of German industrial progress.
10. Post-war fear of Franco-German iron and steel combination as a possible result of Ruhr occupation.

C. FEAR OF AGGRESSIVE MILITARISM ON CONTINENT OF EUROPE.
1. Historic instances--resistance to Napoleon; balance of power policy in 19th century; entente against German militarism in 20th century.
2. Since the war.
A. British support of League of Nations, as a bulwark against military domination of the Continent by one aggressive power.
B. British advocacy of reduction of military armaments (N.B. Lord Robert Cecil).

-143-

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