Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
and Seymour, Diplomatic Background of the War, chs. iv-v, are convenient presentations of the subject, but were published during the war, prior to post-bellum revelations, and should be supplemented with more recent works. Gt. Britain, Foreign Office, Handbooks on German Opinion on National Policy. Imperial Germany, by B. von Bülow (former German chancellor), and The Kaiser's Memoirs, by William II, are interesting because of their authors, but must not be read too credulously. For further research, consult references in Part 5 above, and bibliographies in Gooch, op. cit.; Hayes, Modern Europe (revised ed.), II, 721; Hazen, Europe Since 1815 (revised ed.), II, pp. 1120, 1152, 1150.
A. NATIONALISM.
1. Relatively great importance of the German-speaking people, numerically, culturally, and geographically, in Europe.
2. German nationalism as the force behind Bismarck's wars of unification.
3. German nationalism as the psychological basis of German chauvinism (N.B., Pan-German propaganda) in period 1871-1918.
4. German nationalism as a latent force, suppressed by defeat, in postwar Germany, and an obstacle to any permanent dismemberment.
5. German nationalism and Austria.
a. Bismarck's exclusion of Austria from Germany.
b. Importance of Austro-German alliance, 1879-1918.
c. (c) Agitation, after the war, for union of German- Austria and Germany.

B. INDUSTRIALISM.
1. Remarkable industrial progress of Germany, 1871-1914, dependent on Lorraine iron, Westphalian and Silesian coal, imported cotton, imported grain, scientific technique, intelligent labor, efficient organization and salesmanship.
2. Effect of war and peace treaties on above factors (compare Part 8).
3. Germany's need of food supplies, raw materials, and markets as a vital factor in German foreign policy.

C. IMPERIALISM.
1. Pre-war German imperialism (compare Part 3).
a. As an outgrowth of nationalism and industrialism.
b. As a cause of antagonism between Germany and Entente powers.
2. Collapse of German imperialism as result of defeat, 1918.
3. German industrial enterprises in Russia, South America, etc., after the war, without imperialist protection.

D. MILITARISM AND NAVALISM.
1. Militarism as a characteristic feature of Prussian policy, before 1919.
2. Navalism as an acquired characteristic, adopted at end of 19th century, in response to growth of German imperialism, commerce, shipping and industry.
3. Reduction of German army and navy to impotence by peace treaty of 1919.
4. Survival of militarist sentiments among former Junkers and officers, opposed to republican regime.

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