Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
iii. Consequent increase of investments in foreign countries, involving interest of American investors in "the fate of governments and enterprises in all parts of the world."
iv. Investments in backward countries,--one of the characteristic factors usually leading to imperialism.
d. Increased consumption of imported tropical and subtropical foodstuffs (cocoa and chocolate, coffee, tea, fruits, sugar, molasses, etc.), and hence, increased interest in stable government in countries producing such commodities.
3. Imperialism (compare Part 3-XIV, XV-K).
4. Immigration (compare Part 2).
a. Tendency of immigrants to retain ardent interest in their former countries (e.g., Irish-American interest in Irish independence, Greek-American interest in annexation of Smyrna by Greece, etc.); hence, difficulty of disinterested isolation from European affairs.
b. Opposition to Japanese immigration as a cardinal factor in development of hostility toward Japan, and cause of resentment in Japan.
c. Tendency toward drastic restriction of immigration.
5. Development of negro race-consciousness.
a. Education and other reasons for development of race consciousness in the United States.
b. Negro proposals for an independent negro state in Africa, and for a "Back to Africa" movement, not strongly supported at present, but significant as indications of influence of national self-determination doctrines on negroes.
c. Negro race consciousness as a factor making against American indifference to treatment of negroes in Africa.
6. Improved transportation and communication, diminishing cultural and economic isolation of America from other continents.
7. Propaganda for closer relations with "English-speaking nations."
8. Establishment of the League of Nations (below, Part 10).

C. UNITED STATES AND THE GREAT WAR (compare Part 6-III-C).
1. President Wilson's endeavor to maintain neutrality, at the outset.
2. Failure of neutrality policy as an illustration of operation of above- mentioned factors (especially B, 1, 3, 5).
3. Disillusionment and reaction toward nationalist isolation, at close of war.

D. THE SENATE AND THE PEACE TREATIES (compare Part 6, VII-H).
1. Nature of the Senate's reservations to the treaty of Versailles.
2. Failure of the treaty, with reservations, to obtain the necessary twothirds majority for ratification.
3. Wilson's unwillingness to accept the reservations.

E. AMERICAN POLICIES SINCE THE REJECTION OF THE VERSAILLES TREATY.
1. Adoption of separate peace treaties with Germany, Austria, and Hungary (see Part 6, topic VII-H).
2. The United States and the League of Nations (Part 10-VII-C).

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