Syllabus on International Relations

By Parker Thomas Moon; Institute of International Education (New York, N.Y.) | Go to book overview
ii. Tendency of the Department in recent times to employ increasing number of expert assistants.
iii. Inadequate salaries, political control, and insecurity of office as obstacles to efficiency.
D. Proposed reforms of American foreign service.
i. Increased salaries for diplomatic representatives and State Department officials.
ii. Improvement and extension of examination and merit system, to secure more permanency of career and equal opportunity for advancement.
iii. Emancipation of the foreign service from the spoils system.
iv. Better organization of Department of State.
v. Increased facilities in universities or special schools of foreign service for training of future diplomatists.

VIII. ECONOMIC FUNCTIONS OF DIPLOMACY
Special references:-- * Poole, 55-9. # Fisk and Peirce, International Commercial Policies, chs. xiii-xv and bibliography there given.
A. SIGNIFICANCE OF ECONOMIC FACTORS IN MODERN INTERNATIONAL RE-
LATIONS (see Part 8, above).

B. DIPLOMATIC AND QUASI-DIPLOMATIC ECONOMIC SERVICES.
1. Economic-diplomatic functions of presidents, premiers, secretaries of state, ambassadors and ministers--negotiations regarding reparations, war debts, and loans; commercial treaties; concessions and economic spheres of influence.
2. The consular service--tendency of leading nations to improve and extend consular services, in order to promote trade.
3. Increasing number of trade advisers, trade commissioners, commercial attachés.
4. The problem of organizing and coördinating such services most effectively; wide range of methods and systems employed by different countries.

IX. GENERAL DISCUSSION

A. IMPORTANCE OF DIPLOMACY.
1. As the means of contact between governments.
2. As the means of protecting citizens abroad.
3. As the means of protecting and extending foreign trade and investment.
4. As the means of realizing political aspirations.
5. As a means of preventing international conflict.

B. CHANGING CONDITIONS OF DIPLOMACY.
1. Growth of democracy, making diplomacy less a matter of court intrigue, and more a matter of politics.

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