Library Research Guide to Psychology: Illustrated Search Strategy and Sources

By Nancy E. Douglas; Nathan E. Baum | Go to book overview

Preface

Is This the Book You Need?
The answer is yes if you find yourself in one of the following situations:
You are a college student majoring in psychology who needs to know how to locate appropriate library materials for term papers. This book assumes the card catalog and the Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature ( New York: Wilson, 1905- ) are "old friends," but you need to be introduced to the basic reference sources for psychology. If, by some chance, you do not know how to use the card catalog and the Readers' Guide well, or have not written term papers for other courses that provided good library experiences, then read the warning in the last two paragraphs of this preface.
You are a graduate student in psychology who will be writing a number of research papers. This book will guide you to many useful reference sources.
You are a professor of psychology or a reference librarian to whom students often come for advice on how to find library materials for term papers in psychology. This book will be helpful in supplying that advice.

Caveat Lector (Let the Reader Beware)
Do not begin this book if:
You have not learned how to use the card catalog and the Readers' Guide. Take the five-minute, self- graded test in Appendix I to test your knowledge. If you do poorly on the test, save this book until you have read the pages explaining the card catalog and the Readers' Guide in such books as Margaret G. Cook , The New Library Key, 3d ed. ( New York: Wilson, 1975); or Ella Aldrich, Using Books and Libraries, 5th ed. ( Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice- Hall, 1967).
You need to know the general procedures for writing term papers, including note-taking, outlining, and bibliographical forms. Use this book in conjunction with Kate L. Turabian, Students' Guide for Writing College Papers, 3d ed., rev. ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976); or Lucille Hook and Mary V. Gaver, The Research Paper, 4th ed. ( Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1969); or Robert J. Sternberg, Writing the Psychology Paper ( Woodbury, NY: Baron's Educational Series, 1977).

Acknowledgments

Many people, more than we can name here, generously provided us with assistance and encouragement while this book was being prepared. We are indebted to them all. We would especially like to thank Kathy Jackson, Leila Payne, and many other library staff members at Texas A&M University and the State University of New York at Stony Brook for their continued encouragement and patience; Dr. William S. Rholes of the Psychology Department at Texas A&M and Dr. Xenia Coulter of the Psychology Department at SUNY Stony Brook for taking the time to read the manuscript and share ideas with us; and Scott McCullar for his tailor-made cartoons.

We are especially grateful and indebted to Tom Kirk and Jim Kennedy for the guidance in format and substance provided by their own books in the Library Research Guide Series, particularly for the early chapters of our book. To them, too, we are thankful for the time and concerned effort expended in editing this book. Of course, we remain responsible for any errors or omissions.

-vii-

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