Library Research Guide to Psychology: Illustrated Search Strategy and Sources

By Nancy E. Douglas; Nathan E. Baum | Go to book overview

3 Reviews of the Literature: Annual Review of Psychology

"To live effectively is to live with adequate information." -- Norbert Wiener, The Human Use of Human Beings

For two reasons, books and encyclopedias do not often reflect the current status of a specific topic, nor will they indicate the directions in which current research is headed. First, the writing and publishing of a book is a complicated process that can take as many as three years to complete. Second, the type of sources you have looked at so far were written to present the factual and conceptual scope of a broad subject, such as television violence. These sources do not focus on the latest findings in a specific research area, such as the effects of the violence in television news broadcasts on adult behavior.To obtain a perspective on the current status of an area of research and to get the latest information, two types of sources should be used: review serials and research reports. We will deal with review serials here and will cover access to research reports in Chapters 4 and 5.
Review Serials
Review serials may be defined as publications that come out in parts, have a common title, and contain a number of articles or chapters that give a critical analysis of recent developments and research in a particular area. They usually limit discussion to the one or two years previous to publication. These serials are published in a variety of formats and with various frequencies. As a result, libraries handle review serials in a number of different ways. Monthly or quarterly review serials may be shelved as part of a separate journal collection in some libraries. Annual or biennial review serials might be shelved in the Reference Department or with books on the subject. Still others are irregular in their publication schedule and may be shelved in any of the locations mentioned.
Choosing a Review Serial
Since it is impossible for you to know about all of the review serials that exist, you will need help in identifying appropriate titles. Three possibilities are listed below:
1. Consult Appendix IV of this guide for other general psychology review serials, and also check the appropriate subject sections of this Appendix. For example, the section on abnormal psychology cites seven review serials, including Year Book of Psychiatry and Applied Mental Health. However, since the list in Appendix IV will no doubt be outdated fairly quickly, you will want to try the other methods listed below as well.
2. Consult the card catalog of your library under the broad subject heading into which your topic fits and look for the subdivisions "Periodicals" and "Annuals." This can be a tricky matter and usually requires searching under more headings than you would initially think to check. For example, while "psychology is the obvious heading for your topic, other possible subjects are "psychiatry," and even "sociology," since there may be review serials in those areas which contain relevant articles. Another problem with using the card catalog is that some libraries don't list periodicals in the card catalog.
3. Ask your librarian or professor to suggest possible review serials.

Once you have identified the appropriate title(s), you will need to determine whether your library has them. You may have to check the card catalog and/or a periodicals list or a serials catalog. In any case you will search under the title of the serial, and by all means ask the librarian for help if you need it. Look at the section of Appendix IV which lists the review serials in psychology. Once you have determined that your library has them and where they are shelved, you can consult them for articles. Remember, you are only interested in the material that is more current than the sources you have already consulted. Because it often takes as long as two or three years to get a book published, you should begin your search with issues of review serials published two or three years before publication of the recent relevant texts you used. In this case, the most useful sources are Feshbach ( 1971), the Surgeon General's Report ( 1971) and Howitt ( 1975). Therefore, you should confine your search to the period 1970 to the present.


How to Use the Annual Review of Psychology

The Annual Review of Psychology ( Stanford, CA: Annual Reviews, 1950- ) is an excellent source for most

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Library Research Guide to Psychology: Illustrated Search Strategy and Sources
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 68

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.