Historical Sketches of Statesmen Who Flourished in the Time of George III - Vol. 3

By Lord Henry Brougham | Go to book overview

THE FRENCH REVOLUTION.

IT is impossible to understand the reign of terror which in France succeeded the overthrow of the monarchy, or to form a just idea of the too-celebrated individuals whose names are inseparably attached to the history of that dismal period, without examining the origin of the Revolution, marking the position in which it both found and placed the country, and tracing the steps of its progress from the first commotions that shook the ancient establishments, to the shock that consummated the destruction of the political system, and for a season appeared to threaten the ruin of society itself.

A controversy at one time prevailed upon the share which philosophers and literary men generally had in bringing about the great changes now under our consideration. They who raised this question really meant to discuss the influence which had been exerted by the general diffusion of knowledge and improvement of the people, in creating a desire for more ample privileges and a better system of government. For, although some few reasoners had contended that there was a sect of free-thinking men both disbelieving the religion and disapproving the political institutions of the State, leagued together in a kind of conspiracy to overthrow both, for the purpose of emancipating their species

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Historical Sketches of Statesmen Who Flourished in the Time of George III - Vol. 3
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction. vii
  • Contents ix
  • The French Revolution. 1
  • Robespierre. 51
  • Danton. 72
  • Camille Desmoulins.--St. Just. 87
  • SiÉyes. 111
  • John, Fourth Duke of Bedford. 133
  • Earl Camden. 156
  • Lord Ellenborough. 198
  • Lord Chief Justice Bushe. 223
  • Thomas Jefferson. 237
  • Marquess Wellesley. 266
  • Lord Holland. 325
  • Appendix. 349
  • Erratum *
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