The Mission of William Carmichael to Spain

By Samuel Gwynn Coe | Go to book overview

THE MISSION OF WILLIAM CARMICHAEL TO SPAIN

CHAPTER I
CARMICHAEL'S EARLY LIFE

William Carmichael, son of a Scotch immigrant, William Carmichael, was born in Queen Anne's County, Maryland, where his father had settled near the head of the Chester river. His mother was a Miss Brooke, niece of the second wife of Richard Bennett, one of the richest planters of eastern Maryland, through whom William and his brother, Richard Bennett Carmichael, inherited the Bennett lands in Queen Anne's and Talbot Counties.1 Richard Bennett, whose father of the same name had been Governor of Virginia under the Commonwealth, had no direct heirs, which was a fortunate circumstance for the subject of this sketch, as it enabled him to follow his inclinations to travel, leaving the management of his holdings to his brother.

His education was well cared for as the character of his letters shows. His handwriting is good, his thoughts clearly expressed, and frequent classical allusions occur. The finishing touches were put on at Edinburgh, Scotland.2 His journey abroad for study was evidently prolonged in visiting the British Isles. He was in Ireland for three months in 1768, and testified to the unrest prevalent there. He also forecast the demands of the Irish for privileges during the

____________________
1
Scrap Book History of Queen Anne's County, 34 (clipping from Centreville Observer, Tuesday morning, March 15, 1887), Maryland Historical Society Library, Baltimore, Md.
2
Thomas Jefferson Papers, Manuscripts Division, Library of Congress, Carmichael to Jefferson, November 15, 1787.

-1-

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The Mission of William Carmichael to Spain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I Carmichael's Early Life 1
  • Chapter II Secretary to John Jay 11
  • Chapter III Acting ChangÉ D'Appairs 47
  • Chapter IV ChargÉ D'Affaires 80
  • Chapter V Florida Blanca and Carmichael 99
  • Bibliography 113
  • Index 115
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