The Mission of William Carmichael to Spain

By Samuel Gwynn Coe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
SECRETARY TO JOHN JAY

The commission issued to William Carmichael, after his election to the post of secretary to the Minister plenipotentiary sent to negotiate with Spain, was as follows:1

The United States of America in Congress assembled to the honorable William Carmichael, a delegate in Congress from the State of Maryland, greeting:

We reposing especial trust and confidence in your patriotism, ability, conduct and fidelity, do by these presents constitute and appoint you during our pleasure, secretary to our minister pleni- potentiary, appointed to negotiate a treaty of amity and commerce and of alliance with his Catholic Majesty. You are therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the duty of Secretary, by doing and performing all things thereunto belonging and, in case of the death of our said minister, you are to signify it to us by the earliest opportunity, and on such event we authorize and direct you to take into your charge all our public affairs which were in the hands of said minister at the time of his death, or which may be addressed to him before notice thereof and proceed therein, according to the instructions to our said minister given until our further orders.

Witness his excellency Samuel Huntington, President of the Congress of the United States of America, at Philadelphia, the 29th day of September, in the year of our Lord 1779, and in the fourth year of our Independence,

Samuel Huntington,
President.
Charles Thompson,
Secretary.

The execution of this commission, on its face, seems fraught with few difficulties, except for the possibility of the demise of Mr. Jay, then in the prime of life, and rather more healthy than Carmichael himself, who was frequently troubled with a bilious disorder2 accompanied by fever. Mr. Jay, however, probably having in mind the fate of Arthur Lee who had never been permitted to come to Madrid, although commissioned to treat with Spain, decided to send his secretary from Cadiz to find out whether the Spanish

____________________
1
Wharton, III, p. 712.
2
Jefferson MSS., Carmichae Jefferson, July 15, 1786.

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Mission of William Carmichael to Spain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I Carmichael's Early Life 1
  • Chapter II Secretary to John Jay 11
  • Chapter III Acting ChangÉ D'Appairs 47
  • Chapter IV ChargÉ D'Affaires 80
  • Chapter V Florida Blanca and Carmichael 99
  • Bibliography 113
  • Index 115
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 133

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.