The Mission of William Carmichael to Spain

By Samuel Gwynn Coe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
CHARGÉ D'AFFAIRES

The death of the Spanish King Carlos III, December 14, 1788,1 coming just on the eve of the institution of a new government in the United States, brought a new difficulty in its train for Carmichael. The enemies of the Count de Florida Blanca, observing the approaching end of the king, who had so fully trusted him, had gathered in a disaffected group about the Count de Aranda. Among them were former associates of Carmichael whom he now avoided.2 The new king, Carlos IV, now forty years of age, and dominated by his queen, announced his retention of the ministry of his father. Speculation continued, however, as to the probable successor of Florida Blanca, and the favorites of the queen, two brothers of Estremadura, named Godoy, let it be known that there would soon be a successor.3 In the midst of these court plots, Florida Blanca continued his work, as his health permitted, too proud to seek the favor of the queen to retain his post. Carmichael marked time until orders should come.4

Affairs in Morocco and Algiersconcerned him somewhat during the year 1789. In Morocco the Emperor still continued friendly, and Jefferson, just prior to leaving Paris, had, at Carmichael's request,5 sent a letter of thanks to the Emperor through Joseph Chiappi, our agent at his court.6 The result was evident when an American vessel The Polly of Salem, returning from Cadiz to Salem with a cargo of salt, was captured by two Moorish cruisers. The captains were severely reprimanded by the Emperor and the vessel released with liberal supplies.7 The peace with Morocco seemed

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The Mission of William Carmichael to Spain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I Carmichael's Early Life 1
  • Chapter II Secretary to John Jay 11
  • Chapter III Acting ChangÉ D'Appairs 47
  • Chapter IV ChargÉ D'Affaires 80
  • Chapter V Florida Blanca and Carmichael 99
  • Bibliography 113
  • Index 115
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