A True Republican: The Life of Paul Revere

By Jayne E. Triber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
"MY WORTHY FRIEND REVERE"

WHILE THE REVERES settled into their new home in North Square, the patriot leaders struggled to hold the nonimportation movement together. With the passing of the January 1, 1770, deadline to resume importation, Samuel Adams, William Molineux, and the other leaders used newspapers, town meetings, and coercion to rouse the patriotic spirits of the people and keep pressure on the merchants to continue nonimportation. A letter in the Boston Gazette from "The People" urged the Committee of Inspection to "do your Duty" against the sons of Lieutenant Governor Hutchinson and other violators of nonimportation. On Wednesday, January 17, 1770, at Faneuil Hall, the inhabitants of Boston condemned several merchants, including Benjamin Greene, one of Revere's customers, and Thomas Fletcher, who had attached Revere's estate back in 1765, far "meanly sacrificing the rights of their country to their own avarice and private interest." William Molineux proposed a mass visit to Lieutenant Governor Hutchinson's home to demand that his sons deliver up their contraband tea, but Josiah Quincy, heretofore "esteem'd a violent partizan" of the Sons of Liberty, called Molineux's plan "an Act of high treason." In the end, Molineux, Samuel Adams, and Dr. Thomas Young prevailed; only the people, Molineux proclaimed, could "save the liberties" of their country. Their actions--against the Hutchinsons and, one month later, against Theophilus Lillie--took place in Paul Revere's new neighborhood.1

In early February, as the Boston Gazette reported, "upwards of one hundred Ladies at the North Part of this Town" showed their patriotism by signing an agreement not to drink tea "till the Revenue Acts are repealed." In addition to such peaceful and genteel protests, Boston's patriot leaders relied on mobs who

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A True Republican: The Life of Paul Revere
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.