African American Quotations

By Richard Newman | Go to book overview
on downtown, where the money from the clubs goes right on back downtown, where the jazz is drained to Broadway.

Langston Hughes, 1902-1967 Poet and Writer

1057. [Harlem] is known as being exotic, colorful, and sensuous: a place where life wakes up at night.

James Weldon Johnson, 1871-1938 Writer and Activist

1058. Harlem is the largest plantation in this country.

John O. Killons, 1916-1987 Novelist

1059. Each group has come [to Harlem] with its own separate motives and for its own special ends, but their greatest experience has been the finding of one another.

Alain Locke 1886-1954 Scholar and Critic

1060. Harlem is the precious fruit in the Garden of Eden, the big apple.

Alain Locke 1886-1954 Scholar and Critic

1061. Without pretense to their political significance, Harlem has the same role to play for the New Negro as Dublin had for the New Ireland or Prague for the New Czechoslovakia.

Alain Locke 1886-1954 Scholar and Critic

1062. Harlem is the queen of the black belt, drawing Aframericans together into a vast humming hive.

Claude McKay, 1889-1948 Writer

1063. It was loving the City that distracted me and gave me ideas. Made me think I could speak in its loud voice and make the sound human.

Toni Morrison, 1931- Novelist and Nobel laureate

-167-

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