African American Quotations

By Richard Newman | Go to book overview

RIGHTS
1828. As the agitation which culminated in the abolition of African slavery in this country covered a period of 50 years, so may we expect that before the rights conferred upon us by the [Civil] war amendments are fully conceded, a full century will have passed away.

T. Thomas Fortune, 1856-1928 Journalist

1829. We have waited for more than 340 years for our Constitutional and God-given rights.

Martin Luther King Jr., 1929-1968 Civil rights activist and Nobel laureate

1830. The only way to make sure people you agree with can speak is to support the rights of people you don't agree with.

Eleanor Holmes Norton, 1938- Lawyer and Activist

1831. An insignificant right becomes important when it's assailed.

William Pickens, 1881-1954 Editor and Civil rights activist

1832. I started with this idea in my head, "There's two things I've got a right to--death or liberty."

Harriet Tubman, 1820?-1913 Abolitionist

1833. We have built up your country. We have worked in your fields, and garnered your harvests for 250 years! Do we ask you for compensation for the tears you have caused, and the hearts you have broken, and the lives you have curtailed, and the blood you have spilled? We are willing to let the dead past bury the dead, but we ask you, now, for our RIGHTS.

Henry McNeal Turner, 1834-1915 Minister and Militant activist

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